Tuesday, December 05, 2006

2007 Ford C Max



Another nice interior on a Ford. (One we can't get)

The C Max gets a new front, a revised interior and "more".
A small refresh to make it look more like its larger cousins.

32 comments:

Anonymous said...

If Ford were a smart company they would have thought ahead and made this to US specs.
Right now that would be a great competitor to Kia, Suzuki & Mazda (I know Ford owns Mazda, but come on!)

Anonymous said...

I travelled abroad last month and noticed quite a few nice ford products. Can someone tell me why we can't have these products here in the states? Many of them seem to me like they are just what the us customer is screaming for. What is the problem?

Anonymous said...

I like it. But I guess it does'nt matter since we'll never get it here. Is this vehicle the same as the Mazda 5 by any chance?

Anonymous said...

Ford is bleeding out of every opening and can't figure out how to import or design around some of the best ideas offered in other markets. Go figure. The Max range is outrageously popular and well recieved, but I guess making money and drowning is first in North American...

Anonymous said...

The UAW wont let Ford import those products. When Ford gets those monkeys off thier backs then we will see more euro Fords here. GM is importing Opels as Saturns now so Ford is not too far behind. I drove a European Ford Fiesta while I was there and it drove incredibly well. Ford just announced that the Fiesta (Mazda2) is coming to the States. (I also drove the Opel Astra in Germany. This car is coming to the States as a Saturn soon. You will be amazed when you test-drive this sucker.(If GM doesnt screw-up the suspension for the U.S. market))

Anonymous said...

Never underestimate ford's capacity for shortsighted stupidity.

Anonymous said...

honda fit

Anonymous said...

9:34 - Mz5 is a unique blend of several architectures... tho (I believe) it (& the CX-7!!!) may be a foreshadowing of the "ACE" (Amercian-version of EUCD) platform - C-Max is pure C1.

Anonymous said...

If the UAW was the only issue, then why can't Ford ship the blueprints of the EuroFords to the U.S. so the U.S. autoworkers can build them? Are the engineers UAW also?

Anonymous said...

Thanks 12:26

Anonymous said...

Ford sends the blueprints to Mexico for the Ford Fusion.

Anonymous said...

Why does Ford hate America so much?

Anonymous said...

Ford , ford, wherever you may be, you used to be the leader of the industry, and you' ve led yourself wherever you may be, and you've led yourself to disaster you see!

Anonymous said...

This is actually a Ford that I like better than the Mazda version. Can someone please just put a hit on the UAW, and be done with them? Their influence is not only harming Ford, but their influence effects the products consumers are being offered. There is simply no way an automaker can be competitive with this kind of corporate intrusion.

Anonymous said...

Ford "hates" America because of the stupid parasitic labor laws. The UAW/Taxes/Laws/Regulations are literally sucking the life out of them in the US. Mostly the UAW. Ford is moving to more "friendly" places.

Anonymous said...

Can someone please just put a hit on the UAW, and be done with them? Their influence is not only harming Ford, but their influence effects the products consumers are being offered.

Mine is neither a pro nor anti-union reply, but one for sake of discussion and understanding.

Seriously, how is it that Ford not bringing this car to the States the fault of the UAW? Please be specific and include referenced links. Thank you in advance.

Anonymous said...

Ford "hates" America because of the stupid parasitic labor laws. The UAW/Taxes/Laws/Regulations are literally sucking the life out of them in the US. Mostly the UAW. Ford is moving to more "friendly"

I think I understand where you're coming from, and this is a complex, interesting topic that isn't as easy as simple platitudes. Doesn't the dollar/euro exchange relationship have something to do with all of this? How is it 'mostly' the UAW's fault?

Many people find it easy to blame unions for their salaries and benefit packages for domestic manufacturers' woes. But rarely does one seems to address (with the same zeal as union bashers) the issue of outrageous CEO salaries, benefits, golden parachutes, and poor management of a company.

The apple rots from the core the same as from the skin.

Anonymous said...

How is it 'mostly' the UAW's fault?

This issue is not really that complex if you research US Labor Laws. The National Labor Relations Act signed into law by the Commie/Fascist hybrid Roosevelt transfered control of corporations from the rightful owners (shareholders) to "gangs" of non-owning wage earning employees (Labor Unions). All other problems with corporate management is directly related to the fact that the Labor Unions have final decision authority. The management seems to do really stupid things but it is actually the UAW "interfering" with final decisions. What competent executive would work under these conditions? The best executives will not work at corporations that have labor unions that veto their decisions. Would you?

Dump the labor laws and Ford/GM/Chrysler could start builing the finest cars in the world right here is the US. No Doubt.

Anonymous said...

Hey 12:56...Amen brother.

Anonymous said...

"Can someone please just put a hit on the UAW, and be done with them?"

Consumers are already putting a "hit" on the UAW by buying Toyotas instead of Fords.

Anonymous said...

The UAW also put a stop on advanced technology and automation equipment in an attempt to "save UAW jobs". This by itself made US Ford/GM products uncompetitive.

Anonymous said...

"Consumers are already putting a "hit" on the UAW by buying Toyotas instead of Fords."

Exactly, Toyota, Honda and also now Hyundai are examples of how efficient US productivity can be w/o the intrusion of the UAW. And we see how productive domestic manufacturers can be oversees without the intrusion of the UAW. This seems to suggest that the UAW must be eliminated in order for domestic brands to produce competitive vehicles successfully here. Look at Buick and Cadillac in China, or the stunning Ford vehicles sold in Europe. The UAW is clearly an anachronism that is too shortsighted to see things from a world view. If the UAW had it their way, we’d all be driving $35,000 fwd Monte Carlos with Nascar logos on the side.

Anonymous said...

If the UAW had it their way, we’d all be driving $35,000 fwd Monte Carlos with Nascar logos on the side.

$30,000 for the Monte Carlo and $5000 for the NASCAR stickers. Remember the "Cadillac" Cimmeron..LOL.

Anonymous said...

Interesting perspectives and good discussion points. I've been reading about the union folks who took a buyout of their contract. I wonder if renegotiating contracts is an option or not. At this point in the game, all ideas have to be on the table.

Still, if any of us were the CEO of a major auto manufacturer that lost $1 billion dollars in a year, we'd be out of a job, not the people who build the cars.

Anonymous said...

If the UAW had it their way, we’d all be driving $35,000 fwd Monte Carlos with Nascar logos on the side.

The UAW knows that workers would be out of a job if it cost that much, but they produce some decent cars that are competitively priced. For example, someone looking for a good sedan can get a V-6 powered Impala with nice equipment packages for under $20k.

The big issue for auto workers is that they don't want benefits and wages cut because they negotiated a contract for them.

Anyone would expect their contract to be honored. The executives certainly do.

Anonymous said...

The UAW negotiates contracts from a position of coercive strength because of labor laws. If management does not give into the demands of the UAW, the UAW will go out on Strike. If management then trys to replace them with "Scabs" then management will get hauled off at gunpoint and buried alive in a rape-cage by the Government since replacing striking Union members is a "crime". What a friggin joke...labor laws.

Anonymous said...

Re 3:54...





My Monte comment was just a little tongue-in-cheek humor. I’ll never be a comedian.

But the reality is that the $20,000 Impala is saddled with $2k-$2500 worth of healthcare and legacy costs… at least ten percent. This is five times that of six years ago at a time when the competition is increasing and setting-up non-union production in the US. Imagine if GM used $1500 of what they waste on overpriced labor to spend an extra $300 on interior material upgrades and an extra $1200 on R&D. That extra $300 wholesale cost to GM would likely translate to substantial $1000 worth of value to the consumer… more than enough to surpass the likes of a Camry, Accord or Sonata. On top of that, it would be a much more desireable vehicle, so the need to discount would be less. Meaning, that $20,000 sticker price on the Impala would actually be close to the transaction price and the customer would be buying an honest competitor to the class leaders.

This is why the UAW suffocates an industry that is entirely market driven.

Anonymous said...

But the reality is that the $20,000 Impala is saddled with $2k-$2500 worth of healthcare and legacy costs…

You make your point well, but I'd rather pay American workers wages they negotiated instead of trillions of dollars to invade a country that didn't attack us and didn't have WMDs.

Priorities I guess.

But the point I made was missed. Try to get into an Accord or Camry V-6 for under $20k. You won't. And an Impala well meets the needs of many, many people who enjoy their purchase.

Anonymous said...

The UAW negotiates contracts from a position of coercive strength because of labor laws. If management does not give into the demands of the UAW, the UAW will go out on Strike.

And upper management threatens to fire workers who raise concerns about working conditions or pay. I guess it all depends on whose coercion you support.

I generally side with working Americans who help sustain our economy and their families.

Anonymous said...

The UAW negotiates contracts from a position of coercive strength because of labor laws.

The contract was still NEGOTIATED. AND it's a contract!

Sheesh! How hard is this to understand?

Bet you don't bitch about higher ticket prices when an NFL player renegotiates his contract. No, you probably go and buy a jersey with his name and number on it to wear to the games. Yee haw!

Anyway, the C Max would be a fine addition to Ford's domestic lineup for people who want utility without driving around a school bus every day.

Anonymous said...

The contract was still NEGOTIATED. AND it's a contract!
Sheesh! How hard is this to understand?

The contract was negotiated with a gun to the shareholders head! Do you understand coercion? How bout I hold a gun while we "negotiate" on how much you pay me to mow your lawn.

BTW - Saddam DID have WMDs. Your Gov't sold them to him. The Pentagon has the receipts.

Anonymous said...

The contract was negotiated with a gun to the shareholders head! Do you understand coercion? How bout I hold a gun while we "negotiate" on how much you pay me to mow your lawn.

BTW - Saddam DID have WMDs. Your Gov't sold them to him. The Pentagon has the receipts.


You're insane, but I'm well aware of Reagan and Rumsfeld pumping Iraq full of toxic weapons in the 80's when Saddam gassed fellow Arabs. But where are the weapons the Bush administration lied about? They didn't exist in 2003 and they don't now.

Back to the topic of cars, it's a shame that the American market isn't given as many choices in this class of auto as we have in gas-hog SUVS. But American consumers are mostly to blame for buying wasteful transportation.