Monday, June 10, 2019

All new Jeep Grand Cherokee




Finally, we are getting pictures of the next generation Jeep Grand Cherokee. 

It will be based on the same platform as the Alfa Romeo Stelvio. Unlike the current model which still uses an older Mercedes one.
(The current generation is 9 years old!)

The next one seems larger and sleeker. With a flatter hood.
At least the one pictured here. Apparently, 5 and 7 seater versions have been planned.

If only they could also be working on a new Dodge Challenger. Or Charger. Or a new Chrysler 300...
Or anything that is not a Jeep!





(More pictures of the next Jeep Grand Cherokee HERE)



5 comments:

Steve90041 said...

FCA not visionary. They could crate a super sedan with the Charger.

Harry_Wild said...

New Grand Cherokee looks like the current Chevrolet Tahoe!

Doug said...

I don't know what's going on over at FCA. it seems like they can only engineer one new vehicle at a time.

Fabian said...

Maybe they really don't have more money to engineer more than one new vehicle at a time. Given that, it's the best decision to replace Grand Cherokee first, then Durango. Sedans are dead, so they should rather go for a Chrysler SUV before replacing the 300.

Anonymous said...

The current version may be old, but it still looks great! Hopefully, FCA doesn’t mess this one up!

Jeep and RAM are FCA’s cash cows. They are going to get the attention and resources to keep them going. I do think FCA would claim more market share if they would develop some attractively designed crossovers for the Chrysler brand which would focus on family friendliness and feature a less blocky design language (as well as improved quality and reliability). Not everyone is drawn to Jeep’s design aesthetic. The crossovers could be sold under other brands outside of North America (maybe use them to relaunch and recast Lancia in Europe, possibly?).

Not sure what to do with Dodge since performance vehicles are a very small niche in the market and will likely shrink even more in the future. It will probably cost more to produce such low volume vehicles in the future, especially on the affordable end of the market. It doesn’t fare well for Dodge.